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Carbon stocks and fluxes in the high latitudes: using site-level data to evaluate Earth system models
Author: Chadburn, S. E., G. Krinner, P. Porada, A. Bartsch, C. Beer, L. B. Marchesini, J. Boike, A. Ekici, B. Elberling, T. Friborg, G. Hugelius, M. Johansson, P. Kuhry, L. Kutzbach, M. Langer, M. Lund, F. J. W. Parmentier, S. S. Peng, K. Van Huissteden, T. Wang, S. Westermann, D. Zhu and E. J. Burke
Abstract: It is important that climate models can accurately simulate the terrestrial carbon cycle in the Arctic due to the large and potentially labile carbon stocks found in permafrost-affected environments, which can lead to a positive climate feedback, along with the possibility of future carbon sinks from northward expansion of vegetation under climate warming. Here we evaluate the simulation of tundra carbon stocks and fluxes in three land surface schemes that each form part of major Earth system models (JSBACH, Germany; JULES, UK; ORCHIDEE, France). We use a site-level approach in which comprehensive, high-frequency datasets allow us to disentangle the importance of different processes. The models have improved physical permafrost processes and there is a reasonable correspondence between the simulated and measured physical variables, including soil temperature, soil moisture and snow.
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Page number: 5143-5169
Issue: 22
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PubYear: 2017
Volume: 14
Publication name: Biogeosciences
Abstract: It is important that climate models can accurately simulate the terrestrial carbon cycle in the Arctic due to the large and potentially labile carbon stocks found in permafrost-affected environments, which can lead to a positive climate feedback, along with the possibility of future carbon sinks from northward expansion of vegetation under climate warming. Here we evaluate the simulation of tundra carbon stocks and fluxes in three land surface schemes that each form part of major Earth system models (JSBACH, Germany; JULES, UK; ORCHIDEE, France). We use a site-level approach in which comprehensive, high-frequency datasets allow us to disentangle the importance of different processes. The models have improved physical permafrost processes and there is a reasonable correspondence between the simulated and measured physical variables, including soil temperature, soil moisture and snow.
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