Location:Home>Papers
Elemental and individual particle analysis of atmospheric aerosols from high Himalayas
Author: Cong, Z.Y., et al.
Abstract: Atmospheric aerosols were collected during the scientific expedition to Mt. Qomolangma (Everest) in May-June, 2005. The elemental concentrations of the aerosols were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This yielded data for the concentration of 14 elements: Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb. The mean elemental concentrations were generally comparable with those from central Asia and the Arctic, while much higher than those from Antarctic. Size, morphology, and chemical composition of 900 individual aerosol particles were determined by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Based on morphology and elemental composition, the particles were clustered into eight groups: soot (8%), tar ball (3%), alumosilicates/silica (55%), calcium sulfate (16%), Ca/Mg carbonate (2%), Fe/Ti-rich particles (3%), Pb-rich particles (1%), and biological particles (12%). The sampling site, located at 6,520 m in the Himalayas, is particularly remote and located at high altitude. Nonetheless, high aerosol enrichment factors for copper, chromium, lead, nickel, vanadium, and zinc all suggest the influence of long-range transported pollution, while enrichment in calcium and the presence of alumino-silicates in individual particle analyses indicates a distinct mineral dust influence. The backward air mass trajectories showed that the northwestern part of India may contribute to the atmospheric aerosol in the central high Himalayas.
Contact the author:
Page number: 323-335
Issue: 1-4
Subject:
Authors units:
PubYear: 2010
Volume: 160
Publication name: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
Abstract: Atmospheric aerosols were collected during the scientific expedition to Mt. Qomolangma (Everest) in May-June, 2005. The elemental concentrations of the aerosols were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This yielded data for the concentration of 14 elements: Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb. The mean elemental concentrations were generally comparable with those from central Asia and the Arctic, while much higher than those from Antarctic. Size, morphology, and chemical composition of 900 individual aerosol particles were determined by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Based on morphology and elemental composition, the particles were clustered into eight groups: soot (8%), tar ball (3%), alumosilicates/silica (55%), calcium sulfate (16%), Ca/Mg carbonate (2%), Fe/Ti-rich particles (3%), Pb-rich particles (1%), and biological particles (12%). The sampling site, located at 6,520 m in the Himalayas, is particularly remote and located at high altitude. Nonetheless, high aerosol enrichment factors for copper, chromium, lead, nickel, vanadium, and zinc all suggest the influence of long-range transported pollution, while enrichment in calcium and the presence of alumino-silicates in individual particle analyses indicates a distinct mineral dust influence. The backward air mass trajectories showed that the northwestern part of India may contribute to the atmospheric aerosol in the central high Himalayas.
The full text link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10661-008-0698-3