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  • Joseph Dauben

Joseph W. Dauben/ CURRICULUM VITAE   Department of History Herbert H. Lehman College The City University of New York 250 Bedford Park Boulevard West Bronx, New York 10468 Office: [718] 960-8285/ 8289 E-Mail: jdauben@att.net Ph.D. Program in History The Graduate School and University Center The City University of New York 365 Fifth Avenue at 34th Street New York, NY 10016-4309 Office: [212] 817-8430 FAX: [212] 817-1523 Joseph W. Dauben is Distinguished Professor of History and the History of Science at Herbert H. Lehman College of the City University of New York, where he was named Outstanding Teacher of the Year in 1986. He also serves as a member of the graduate faculty of the Ph.D. Program in History at the Graduate Center, CUNY, where he is Director of Interdisciplinary Studies and Executive Officer of the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program. He also teaches an occasional course on the “History of Botany” at the New York Botanical Garden. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, was elected a Fellow of the New York Academy of Sciences in 1982, and in 1990 was elected a Membre Effectif of the International Academy of History of Science, having been a “Corresponding Member” since 1984. He is also a member of the Society of Fellows of the American Academy in Rome. From 1976–1986 he served as Editor of Historia Mathematica, an international journal for the history of mathematics published by Academic Press. In 1986 he was elected Chairman of the International Commission on History of Mathematics, which he served for two terms, through 1993. Professor Dauben spent 1977–78 at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, and in 1981 received a Guggenheim Fellowship which he spent as a Visiting Scholar at Harvard. His first book, Georg Cantor, His Mathematics and Philosophy of the Infinite, was published by Harvard University Press in 1979 with support from the Mellon Foundation; it has been reprinted in paperback by Princeton University Press (1990). A Chinese edition translated by Zheng Yu–Xin (Nanjing University) appeared in 1989, and a Japanese translation has just been announced by Iwanami Shoten in Tokyo, due to be published in 1999. His most recent book, Abraham Robinson. The Creation of Nonstandard Analysis, A Personal and Mathematical Odyssey, was published by Princeton University Press in 1995; a paperback edition has been in print since the Spring of 1998, and a Chinese translation by Wang Qian is due to be published by the Science Press of Beijing early in 2004. In 1985 Professor Dauben spent three weeks lecturing in the Soviet Union as a guest of the Soviet Academy of Sciences, and in the spring of 1988 he spent four months in China as a Visiting Scholar jointly sponsored by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the Academia Sinica in Beijing. In January of 1988 he was invited to deliver one of four plenary lectures at the Centennial meeting of the American Mathematical Society, and has recently been named a national lecturer in the Visiting Lecturers Program of the Mathematical Association of America. In the summer of 1998 he delivered one of the invited plenary lectures for history of mathematics at the International Congress of Mathematicians, held in Berlin. In 1991 Professor Dauben was awarded a three–year grant by the National Endowment for the Humanities to produce, in collaboration with colleagues in Beijing, Singapore and Taipei, a critical edition of the 十部算經 (Shi Bu Suan Jing), the Ten Classics of Ancient Chinese Mathematics. During the fall semester, 1991, Professor Dauben was a visiting member of the Institute of History, National Tsing–Hua University, Taiwan, and in the fall of 1995-96 he also taught at the Institute of Mathematics of National Taiwan Normal University in Taipei. He is also a Visiting Professor of the Institute for History of Natural Sciences of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. For 1998-99, Professor Dauben was awarded an ACLS Senior Fellowship, and spent the year partly in Beijing, partly in Cambridge, England, working on a new book tentatively titled Marx, Mao and Mathematics. Nonstandard Analysis and the Cultural Revolution. For the Fall Term, 1999, he was elected a Visiting Fellow at Clare Hall, Cambridge University, where he was also affiliated with the Needham Institute. In January of 2000 he was elected a Life Member by the Board of Governors of Clare Hall. In the fall of 2001 he was elected a foreign member of the Deutsche Akademie der Naturforscher Leopoldina, the oldest scientific academy in Europe with a continuous history since its founding in Schweinfurt in 1652. On November 6, 2002, he was made an honorary member of the Institute for History of Natural Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and in the spring of 2005 he will return to the Institute as Zhu Kezhen Visiting Professor of the History of Science. HIGHER EDUCATION:   Claremont McKenna College   1962-1966 A.B. (Magna Cum Laude) 1966 Honors in Mathematics; Honors in Literature Harvard University   1966-1972 A.M. History of Science 1968 Ph.D. History of Science 1972   HIGHER EDUCATION: Claremont McKenna College 1962-1966 A.B. (Magna Cum Laude) 1966 Honors in Mathematics; Honors in Literature Harvard University 1966-1972 A.M. History of Science 1968 Ph.D. History of Science 1972   DAUBEN, Joseph W. CURRICULUM VITAE CONTINUED (Page 2) SELECTED PUBLICATIONS BOOKS AND MONOGRAPHS: Georg Cantor: His Mathematics and Philosophy of the Infinite (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1979), 404pp. Chinese translation by Zheng Yu-xin, Nanjing: Nanjing University Press, 1989. Reprinted with a paperback edition by Princeton University Press, 1990; a Japanese translation (Iwanami Shoten) is in preparation. Editor, Mathematical Perspectives: Essays on Mathematics and its Historical Development (New York: Academic Press, 1981), 272pp. The Intersection of History and Mathematics, J. Dauben, Chikara Sasaki, and Mitsuo Sugiura, eds., (Basel: Birkhäuser, 1994). Abraham Robinson. The Creation of Nonstandard Analysis, A Personal and Mathematical Odyssey (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995; paperback ed., 1998; Chinese translation by Wang Qian, to appear in 2004), 548pp. States of the Art. Flores quadrivii: Studies in Honor of Christoph J. Scriba, J. Dauben, Menso Folkerts, Eberhard Knobloch, and Hans Wußing, eds., San Diego: Academic Press, 1996, 394pp. Editor, The History of Mathematics from Antiquity to the Present (NY: Garland Press, 1985, 467pp.; rev. ed., Albert Lewis, ed., CD-ROM version, The American Mathematical Society, 2000). Writing the History of History of Mathematics (an Historiography Project of the International Commission on History of Mathematics), J. Dauben and C.J. Scriba, eds., Basel: Birkhäuser, 2002. From China to Paris: 2000 Years of Mathematical Transmission. Proceedings of a Conference Held at the Rockefeller Foundation Research and Conference Center, Bellagio, Italy, May, 2000, J. Dauben, Y. Dold-Samplonius, and M. Folkerts, eds., in Boethius (Stuttgart: Steiner Verlag, 2002)). CHAPTERS IN BOOKS: “The Development of Cantorian Set Theory,” Chapter V of From the Calculus to Set Theory, 1630–1910, ed. Ivor Grattan-Guinness (London: Duckworths, 1977), pp. 181-219. “Mathematics in Germany and France in the Early 19th Century: Transmission and Transformation,” in Epistemological and Social Problems of the Development of the Sciences in the Early 19th Century, ed. M. Otte (Dordrecht: D. Reidel, 1981), pp. 371-399. “Conceptual Revolutions and the History of Mathematics: Two Studies in the Growth of Knowledge,” in E. Mendelsohn, ed. Transformation and Tradition in the Sciences (Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 1984), pp. 81-103. “Abraham Robinson and Nonstandard Analysis: History, Philosophy and Foundations of Mathematics,” in P. Kitcher and W. Aspray, eds., New Perspectives on the History and Philosophy of Mathematics (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1987), pp. 177-200. “Mathematics,” Chapter 4 of The Reader's Adviser (New York: R.R. Bowker, 1988), pp. 82-119. “Abraham Robinson: Les Infinitesimaux, l’Analyse Non-Standard, et les Fondements des Mathématiques,” in H. Barreau, ed., La Mathématique Non–Standard (Fondements des Sciences; Paris: Editions du CNRS, 1989), pp. 157-184. “La Matematica,” in W. Shea, ed., Storia delle Scienze. Le Scienze Fisiche e Astronomiche (Milano: Banca Popolare di Milano, 1991, and Einaudi, 1992), pp. 258-289. “Are There Revolutions in Mathematics?” in J. Echeverría, A. Ibarra and T. Mormann, eds., The Space of Mathematics (Berlin: De Gruyter, 1992), pp. 203-226. “Conceptual Revolutions and the History of Mathematics: Two Studies in the Growth of Knowledge,” Chapter 4 of D. Gillies, ed., Revolutions in Mathematics (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992; issued in paperback, 1995), pp. 49-71. “Revolutions Revisited,” Chapter 5 of D. Gillies, ed., Revolutions in Mathematics (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992; issued in paperback, 1995), pp. 72-82. “Mathematics: An Historian's Perspective,” in Sasaki Chikara, ed., The Intersection of History and Mathematics. Proceedings of the International Symposium on History of Mathematics (Tokyo, 1990; Basel: Birkhäuser, 1994), pp. 1-13. “Mathematical Exchanges Between the United States and China,” (with Zhang Dian–Zhou, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China), in E. Knobloch and D. Rowe, eds., History of Modern Mathematics (Orlando: Academic Press, 1994), pp. 263-297. “Peirce and History of Science,” in Peirce and Contemporary Thought: Philosophical Inquiries. Proceedings of the Plenary Lectures delivered at the Peirce Sesquicentennial Congress (Harvard University, 1989; New York: Fordham University Press, 1995), pp. 146-195. DAUBEN, Joseph W. CURRICULUM VITAE CONTINUED (Page 3) “Paradigms and Proofs: How Revolutions Transform Mathematics,” Paradigms and Mathematics, Elena Ausejo and Mariano Hormigón, eds., (Madrid: Siglo XXI de España, 1996), pp. 117-148. “Arguments, Logic and Proof: Mathematics, Logic and the Infinite,” History of Mathematics and Education: Ideas and Experiences. Proceedings of the Essen Symposium on Foundations and 19th-century Mathematics, H.N. Jahnke, N. Knoche and M. Otte, eds., Göttingen, Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, Studien zur Wissenschafts-, Sozial- und Bildungsgeschichte der Mathematik, vol. 11, 1996, pp. 113-148. “Mathematics at the University of Toronto: Abraham Robinson in Canada (1951-1957),” States of the Art. Flores quadrivii: Studies in Honor of Christoph J.Scriba, San Diego: Academic Press, 1996, pp. 93-136. “Mathematics: An Historian's Perspective” (Chinese), in A Festschrift in Honor of Professor Du Shi-Ran of the Institute for History of Natural Sciences of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Beijing: Institute for History of Natural Science, 1997), pp. 97-111. “Historia Mathematicae: Journals of the History of Mathematics,” International Symposium on Journals and History of Science, in honor of the 10th anniversary of the founding of the Italian journal Nuncius (Firenze, June 5-6, 1997), in Journals and History of Science, Marco Beretta, Claudio Pogliano, and Pietro Redondi, eds., Florence: Olschki Editore, 1998, pp. 1-30. “Mathematics and Ideology: The Politics of Infinitesimals/Marx, Mao and Mathematics: Nonstandard Analysis and the Cultural Revolution,” E. Ausejo and M. Hormigón, eds., Proceedings of the III Simposio Internacional Galdeano (University of Zaragoza, Spain, September, 1996; in press). “History of Mathematics in the 19th Century: An Historiographic Overview,” Chapter 5 in From Natural Philosophy to the Sciences: Historiography of Nineteenth-Century Science, David Cahan, ed., Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2003, pp. 129-162. “The United States” and (with Liu Dun) “China,” chapters in Writing the History of History of Mathematics (an Historiography Project of the International Commission on History of Mathematics), J. Dauben and C.J. Scriba, eds., Basel: Birkhäuser, 2002. “Professionalization of Mathematics in Modern China: From the Opium Wars to the Founding of the People’s Republic of China,” in Mathematics Unbound: The Evolution of an International Mathematical Community, K.H. Parshall and A. Rice, eds., Providence, R.I., and London, England: The American Mathematical Society and the London Mathematical Society, 2003. “From Xu Guangqi to Hua Loo-Keng:The Legacy of Matteo Ricci and the Rise of Modern Mathematics in China,” Matteo Ricci and After: Four Centuries of Cultural Interactions between China and the West. Proceedings of a Conference Held at the City Univrsity of Hong Kong, October, 2001 (Hong Kong: City University of Hong Kong Press, in press). ARTICLES IN JOURNALS AND PERIODICALS: “Marat, His Science and the French Revolution,” Archives internationales d’histoire des sciences, 88-89 (1969), pp. 235-261. “The Trigonometric Background to Georg Cantor's Theory of Sets,” Archive for History of Exact Sciences, 7 (1971), pp. 181-216. “Georg Cantor's Philosophy of Mathematics: the Irrational and the Transfinite Numbers,” Proceedings of the XIIIth International Congress of the History of Science, 5 (Moscow, 1974), pp. 86-93. “Denumerability and Dimension: The Origins of Georg Cantor’s Theory of Sets,” Rete, 2 (1974), pp. 105-134. “Hypotheses non Fingo: Georg Cantor’s Set Theory and His Philosophy of the Infinite,” Proceedings of the XIVth International Congress of the History of Science, 2 (Tokyo: Science Council of Japan, 1975), pp. 107-110. “The Invariance of Dimension: Problems in the Early Development of Set Theory and Topology,” Historia Mathematica, 2 (1975), pp. 273-288. “Georg Cantor and Pope Leo XIII: Philosophical and Theological Dimensions of Trans­finite Set Theory,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 38 (1977), pp. 85-108. “C.S. Peirce's Philosophy of Infinite Sets,” Mathematics Magazine, 50 (3)(May, 1977), pp. 123-135. “Georg Cantor: The Personal Matrix of his Mathematics,” Isis, 69 (1978), pp. 534-550. “Georg Cantor: The Roles of Personality and Psychology in the Creation of Transfinite Set Theory,” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences: Papers in Mathematics, 321 (New York: The New York Academy of Sciences, 1979), pp. 27-45. “Mathematics and World War I: The International Diplomacy of G.H. Hardy and Gösta Mittag–Leffler,” Festschrift in Honor of Erwin N. Hiebert, Historia Mathematica, 7 (1980), pp. 261-288. “Peirce’s Critique of Cantorian Set Theory,” Proceedings of the C.S. Peirce Bicentennial International Congress, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (Lubbock, Texas: Texas Tech University Press, 1981), pp. 93-98. DAUBEN, Joseph W. CURRICULUM VITAE CONTINUED (Page 4) “Progress of Mathematics in the Early 19th Century: Context, Contents and Consequences,” Acta historiae rerum naturalium necnon technicarum, Special issue 13 (Prague: Institute of Czechoslovak and General History, Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, 1982), pp. 223-260. “Science and the Industrial Revolution in Bolzano's Epoch,” Acta historiae rerum naturalium necnon technicarum, Special issue 13 (Prague: Institute of Czechoslovak and General History, Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, 1982), pp. 185-187. “Sustaining a Specialty Journal: Historia Mathematica,” Proceedings of the XVIth International Congress for the History of Science (Bucharest, Romania, August, 1982); also reprinted, Historia Mathematica, 9 (1982), pp. 211-215. “Peirce's Place in Mathematics,” Festschrift in Honor of Carolyn Eisele, Historia Mathematica, 9 (1982), pp. 311-325. “Georg Cantor and the Origins of Transfinite Set Theory,” Scientific American, 248 (June, 1983), pp. 122-131. “Georg Cantor e la Teoria degli Insiemi Transfinite,” Le Scienze, 31(August, 1983), pp. 84-93. “La filosofía de C.S. Peirce sobre los conjuntos infinitos,” Mathesis, 2(2)(May, 1986), pp. 191-212. “Gai Nian Ge Ming He Shu Xue Shi — Zhi Shi Zeng Zhang De Liang Ge An L” (Revolutionary Concepts in History of Mathematics — Two Case Studies), in Ze Ran Ke Xue Zhe Xue Wen , 4 (1987), pp. 52-59. “Ancient Chinese Mathematics: Not the Euclidean Way,” Thesis, 4(1)(Spring, 1990), pp. 4-9. “Abraham Robinson, el Hombre y sus Matemáticas,” Mathesis, 8 (1992), pp. 73-108. “Mathematics: An Historian's Perspective,” Philosophy and the History of Science, 2 (1993), pp. 1-21. “Matemáticas: La perspectiva de un historiador,” Llull. Revista de la Sociedad Española de Historia de las Ciencias y de las Técnicas, 16 (1993), pp. 23-41. “Mathematics in Asia,” co-authored with Karine Chemla, Dun Liu and Chikara Sasaki, Cronache. Physis. Rivista Internazionale di Storia della Scienza, 31 (1994), pp. 563-569. “Charles S. Peirce, Evolutionary Pragmatism and the History of Science,” Centaurus. International Magazine of the History of Mathematics, Science and Technology (Denmark), 38 (1996), pp. 22-82. “The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics: Cartesian Linguistics, the Mind-Body Problem and Pragmatic Evolution,” Proceedings of the II International Congress on Ontology, San Sebastián and Barcelona, Spain (September, 1996), in Víctor Gómez Pin, ed., Descartes. Lo racional y lo real, a special number of Enrahonar. Quaderns de Filosofia (1999), pp. 125-137. “Marx, Mao and Mathematics: The Politics of Infinitesimals,” Documenta Mathematica. Journal der Deutschen Mathematiker-Vereinigung. Proceedings of the International Congress of Mathematicians, Berlin, August 18-27, 1998, vol. 3, Plenary Lectures and Ceremonies, (1998), pp. 799-810. “Historia Mathematica: 25 Years/Context and Content,” (in honor of the 25th anniversary of the journal’s founding), Historia Mathematica, 26 (1999), pp. 1-23. ESSAY REVIEW ARTICLES: Stanley L. Jaki, Science and Creation. From Eternal Cycles to an Oscillating Universe; reviewed in Annals of Science, 34 (1977), 613-636. Louis L. Bucciarelli and Nancy Dworsky, Sophie Germain. An Essay in the History of the Theory of Elasticity; reviewed in The American Mathematical Monthly, 92 (January, 1985), pp. 64-70. Herbert Mehrtens, Die Entstehung der Verbandstheorie (Hildesheim: Gerstenberg Ver­lag, 1979); reviewed in Order, 3 (1986), pp. 89-102. Michael Hallett, Cantorian Set Theory and Limitation of Size (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1984); reviewed in British Journal of Philosophy of Science, 39 (1988), pp. 179-188. Jean-Claude Martzloff, Histoire des mathématiques chinoises, Paris: Masson, 1988; reviewed in Historia Mathematica, 20 (1993), pp. 437-446. Joseph Brent, Charles Sanders Peirce. A Life (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1993); Carl R. Hausman, Charles S. Peirce’s Evolutionary Philosophy (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993.); Edward C. Moore, ed., Charles S. Peirce and the Philosophy of Science. Papers from the Harvard Sesquicentennial Congress (Tuscaloosa: The University of Alabama Press, 1993); Charles Sanders Peirce, Reasoning and the Logic of Things. The Cambridge Conferences Lectures of 1898, K.L. Ketner, ed., with an introduction by K.L. Ketner and Hilary Putnam (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1991); Charles S. Peirce, Writings of Charles S. Peirce. A Chronological Edition, Vol. 5 (1884-1886), C.J.W. Kloessel, et al., eds. (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1993); and John Patrick Diggins, The Promise of Pragmatism. Modernism and the Crisis of Knowledge and Authority (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994); all reviewed as “Searching for the Glassy Essence: Recent Studies on Charles Sanders Peirce,” Isis, 86 (1995), pp. 290-299. DAUBEN, Joseph W. CURRICULUM VITAE CONTINUED (Page 5) Elena Ausejo and Mariano Hormigón, eds., Messengers of Mathematics: European Mathematical Journals (1800-1946); reviewed in Lull, 18 (1995), pp. 303-327. James Glimm, John Impagliazzo, and Isadore Singer, eds., The Legacy of John von Neumann (Providence, R.I.: American Mathematical Society, 1990); reviewed for Ganita Brat. Bulletin of the Indian Society for History of Mathematics, 17 (1995), pp. 108-116. Lavine, Shaughan, Understanding the Infinite (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1994), reviewed for History and Philosophy of Logic, 18 (1997), pp. 33-40. M. Folkerts and J.P. Hogendijk, eds., Vestigia Mathematica. Studies in medieval and early modern mathematics in honour of H.L.L. Busard (Amsterdam and Atlanta: Rodopi, 1993); reviewed for the Archives internationales d’histoire des sciences, 47 (1997), pp. 177-186. Gert König, ed., Konzepte des mathematisch Unendlichen im 19. Jahrhundert (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1990); reviewed for the Archives internationales d’histoire des sciences, 47 (1997), pp. 173-177. Jean-Claude Martzloff, A History of Chinese Mathematics, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1997; reviewed in Nieuw Archief voor Wiskunde, 17 (1999), pp. 491-498. Michel Jeanneret, Perpetual Motion. Transforming Shapes in the Renaissance from da Vinci to Montaigne, Nidra Poller, trans., Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press, 2001; reviewed in Nature, 411 (6838) (June 7, 2001), pp. 636-637. Georges Ifrah, The Universal History of Numbers. From Prehistory to the Invention of the Computer (Volume I), reviewed in the Notices of the American Mathematical Society, 49 (1)(January), pp. 32-38. Georges Ifrah, The Universal History of Computing. From the Abacus to the Quantum Computer (Volume II), reviewed in the Notices of the American Mathematical Society, 49 (2)(February), pp. 211-216. CD-ROM PUBLICATIONS: Editor, The History of Mathematics from Antiquity to the Present (NY: Garland Press, 1985, 467pp.; rev. ed., Albert Lewis, ed., CD-ROM version, The American Mathematical Society, 2000). This publication of the American Mathematical Society has just been named an "Outstanding Academic Title" by CHOICE, the national review published for academic libraries, to be announced in its January issue for 2002. EDITORSHIPS: Managing Editor, Historia Mathematica, 1976-1978. Editor, Historia Mathematica, 1978-1986. Historia Mathematica is an International Journal of the History of Mathematics, published by the Commission on History of Mathematics of the Division of the History of Science of the International Union for the History and Philosophy of Science, and by Academic Press, New York City. FILMS AND VIDEO TAPES: “Georg Cantor and the Battle for Transfinite Set Theory,” Invited Plenary Lecture, Annual Joint Meeting of the American Mathematical Society (AMS Centennial Meeting) and the Mathematical Association of America, Atlanta, GA, January, 1988; distributed by the Mathematical Association of America (50 minutes). “The Art of Renaissance Science,” for Science Television, 1990 (53 minutes). This production is currently viewable on the World Wide Web, and is hosted at the public web site of the University of Padua Observatory, the Italian Supercomputer Center CRS4 at: http://www.crs4.it/Ars/arshtml/arstitle.html, and on the intranet of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. At DeepBridge, a searchable streaming video version of this tape can be seen at: http://160.79.44.44/vss-bin/vss_SR/artofscience/search.